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Basilica of St. Peter

Basilica of St. Peter

Subway: 8 stops

St. Peter’s Basilica in Vatican is a church of the Vatican City, within the territory of Rome ; It is the largest of the papal basilicas and the largest church in the world and as well the center of Catholicism . St. Peter’s Basilica is one of the biggest buildings in the world : 218 meters long and high up to the dome 133.30 meters , the total area is about 23,000 square meters and can hold 60.000 worshipers.

Colosseum

Colosseum

Subway: 4 stops

Known as the Colosseum because of the colossal bronze statue of Nerone which was placed near the monument in the second sec.d.C., it is actually called Flavian Amphitheatre . Wanted by the emperor Vespasian and completed by his son Titus in 80 d.C. , the building was intended for battles and games between gladiators and hunting simulations to wild and exotic animals . Two thousand years old but the Colosseum is still the symbol of the eternal city , attracting thousands of visitors every year.

Pantheon

Pantheon

Bus: 12 stops

The Pantheon was inspiration of the greatest architects of the Renaissance , so that Raffaello wanted to make it his place of eternal rest . As the only Roman construction remained virtually intact over the centuries , this building was founded between 25 and 27 B.C. by Agrippa , as a temple dedicated to the twelve gods and the living monarch.

Trevi Fountain

Trevi Fountain

Subway: 4 stops

The famous fountain in Rococo style was built first by Nicola Salvi in 1732 then completed in 1762 by Giuseppe Pannini .The monument depicts an ocean on a shell-shaped chariot drawn by sea horses led by tritons . The fountain was the wonderful setting of a scene from the famous Fellini’s movie “La dolce vita” in which a provocative Anita Ekberg gets wet in the waters of the fountain calling Marcello Mastroianni . Before you get away do not forget to throw a coin in the fountain , will ensure you return to the Eternal City!

Piazza Navona

Piazza Navona

Bus: 9 stops

The most beautiful baroque square of Rome , occupies the runway of the old ” Stadium of Domitian” , which has perfectly preserved the arena elongated shape . Used in antiquity for athletic contests and competitions of various kinds , today the square is home for street artists, painters and portraitists . At the center of the square stands the monumental fountain of the Four Rivers by Bernini, to the north the Moro Fountain, retouched by the same Bernini and at the south the Neptune fountain. The square is still a meeting place for Romans and tourists , who enjoy the many outdoor cafes that surround it.

Piazza di Spagna

Piazza di Spagna

Subway: 5 stops

Piazza di Spagna (in the seventeenth century “square in France”) , with the Spanish Steps , is one of the most famous squares in Rome . It owes its name to the palace of Spain , Embassy of the Iberian state to the Holy See . At the center of the square there’s the famous Fountain of the Ugly Boat , which dates from the early Baroque , sculpted by Pietro Bernini and his son, the famous Gian Lorenzo Bernini.

Coppedè neighborhood

Coppedè neighborhood

5 min on foot

In the heart of Rome , few steps from the historic center, there is one of the most characteristic neighborhoods of the city . In fact not a real neighborhood , but a corner of Rome by the unexpected and bizarre features , a fantastic mixture of Art Nouveau, Art Deco, with infiltration of Greek art, Gothic , baroque and even medieval . It was so named by the same architect who designed it, Gino Coppedè. This enchanting place of Rome has inspired more than one movies.

Macro

Macro

5 min on foot

The Museum of Contemporary Art of Rome aspires to confirm itself as an international center of contemporary art. In its exhibition spaces, it realizes art shows of foreign artists who have developed a special relationship with Rome as well as important exhibitions in collaboration with foreign Embassies and foreign cultural institutes and start relationships with major contemporary art centers of Europe and the world to promote co-productions of exhibition projects and exchanges of initiatives.

Villa Torlonia

Villa Torlonia

Few steps

Originally an agricultural property owned by the Pamphili family was purchased at the end of the eighteenth century by the banker Giovanni Torlonia who commissioned Giuseppe Valadier the project of transformation in his own residence. After a long period of neglect, the villa became the twenties residence of Mussolini’s family. In 1978 Villa Torlonia was purchased by the City of Rome and turned into a public park. The green southern area of the park is modeled on the taste of the romantic gardens, with the inclusion of ponds, irregular streets and new buildings designed in accordance with the eclectic spirit.